Accessibility and colours

Approximately 1 in 12 men (8%) and 1 in 200 women suffer from colour blindness. There are many different forms of colour blindness:

Normal Vision

Deuteranomaly

Protanomaly

Protanopia

Deuteranopia

Tritanopia

Tritanomaly

Achromatopsia

 

Use these 3 helpful rules when choosing your colours

“Get it right in black and white”

Make sure your design works in greyscale (black and white) before adding in colour. Don’t assume colours will signal meaning when used on their own.

“The safest hue is blue”

The richest colour across all types of colour blindness is blue, therefore blue is often a good colour choice.

“Red and green should never be seen”

Avoid using red and green together as they are difficult to distinguish from one another in the more common types of colour blindness.